MIGRAINE HEADACHES

Migraines are chronic headaches that can cause significant pain for hours or even days.
Symptoms can be so severe that all you can think about is finding a dark, quiet place to lie down.
While there are many causes for them, one 'symptom' that is constant - if you suffer from them,
Migraines
can be one of the most debilitating conditions known to man.

For those of you who suffer from Migraines - while causes, triggers and treatment are very important, relief is probably the biggest reason to visit the doctor's office because the pain you feel is indescribable to anyone who has not had a true Migraine headache. How many friends have you've listened to describe their "Migraine" saying it helped to get outside in the sunlight or listen to music?
Migraines may be caused by changes in the trigeminal nerve, a major pain pathway. Imbalances in brain chemicals, including serotonin — which helps regulate pain in your nervous system — also may be involved.
Serotonin levels drop during migraines. This may trigger your trigeminal system to release substances called neuropeptides, which travel to your brain's outer covering (meninges). The result is headache pain.
Some migraines are preceded or accompanied by sensory warning symptoms or signs (auras), such as flashes of light, blind spots or tingling in your arm or leg. A migraine is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound.
Although there's no cure, medications can help reduce the frequency and severity of migraines. If treatment hasn't worked for you in the past, it's worth talking to your doctor about trying a different migraine medication. The right medicines combined with self-help remedies and lifestyle changes may make a tremendous difference.
Migraines usually begin in childhood, adolescence or early adulthood, men & women alike.
A typical migraine attack produces some or all of these signs and symptoms:

When untreated, a migraine typically lasts from four to 72 hours, but the frequency with which headaches occur varies from person to person. You may have migraines several times a month or much less frequently.
Not all migraines are the same. Most people experience migraines without auras, which were previously called common migraines. Some people have migraines with auras, which were previously called classic migraines. Auras can include changes to your vision, such as seeing flashes of light, and feeling pins and needles in an arm or leg.
Whether or not you have auras, you may have one or more sensations of premonition (prodrome) several hours or a day or so before your headache actually strikes, including:

When to see a doctor
Migraines are often undiagnosed and untreated. If you experience signs and symptoms of migraine, keep a record of your attacks and how you treated them. Then make an appointment with your doctor to discuss your headaches and decide on a treatment plan.
Even if you have a history of headaches, see your doctor if the pattern changes or your headaches suddenly feel different.
See your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room if you have any of the following signs and symptoms, which may indicate other, more serious medical problems:

Although much about the cause of migraines isn't understood, genetics and environmental factors seem to both play a role.
Migraines may be caused by changes in the trigeminal nerve, a major pain pathway. Imbalances in brain chemicals, including serotonin — which helps regulate pain in your nervous system — also may be involved.
Serotonin levels drop during migraines. This may trigger your trigeminal system to release substances called neuropeptides, which travel to your brain's outer covering (meninges). The result is headache pain.
Migraine triggers
Whatever the exact mechanism of the headaches, a number of things may trigger them. Common migraine triggers include:

Give us a call to help control your Migraine Pain and/or Work Closely with Your
Primary Care Physician Who is Treating the Cause of your Migraines.